Past Winners

Listed below are past winners and honorable mention awards for the Carrie Chapman Catt Prize for Research on Women and Politics, including their professional positions and institutional affiliations at the time of their selection. This information may not reflect their current position and/or location.

2016 Winners

  • Xinhui Jiang, Ph.D. candidate in political science and international relations at the University of Delaware in Newark, for "Where is the Half Sky? Women's representation in county people's congresses in China."
  • Catherine Wineinger, Ph.D. candidate in political science at Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey, for "Gendering the GOP: Republican women and the evolution of women's representation in Congress."

Honorable Mention

  • Elizabeth D. Katz, Ph.D. candidate in history at Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, for "Courting American families: The creation and evolution of courts of domestic relations."
  • Jeong Hyun Kim, Ph.D. candidate in political science at Washington University in St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri, for "Direct democracy and women's political participation: Evidence from Sweden."
  • Tim LaPira, associate professor of political science at James Madison University, Harrisonburg, Virginia; Kathleen Marchetti, assistant professor of political science at Dickinson College, Carlisle, Pennsylvania; and Herschel F. Thomas, assistant professor of political science at the University of Texas at Arlington, for "Gender and lobbying."
  • Kimberly Saks McManaway, Ph.D. candidate in political science at Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan, for "Framing gender, family and economics in the paid family leave debate."

2015 Winners

  • Tiffany D. Barnes, assistant professor of political science at the University of Kentucky, Lexington, and Constanza F. Schibber, Ph.D. candidate in political science at Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri, for “The Successes of Female Representatives: Causes and Consequences of a Gendered Distribution of Legislative Power.”
  • Christina Ladam, Ph.D. candidate in political science at the University of Colorado, Boulder; Jason Windett, assistant professor in political science at Saint Louis University, St. Louis, Missouri; and Jeffrey J. Harden, assistant professor of political science at the University of Colorado, Boulder; for “Does the Election of Female Governors Influence Women's Political Ambition?”
  • Jennifer Rosen, visiting assistant professor of sociology at Pepperdine University, Malibu, California, for “Gender Quotas for Women in National Politics: A Comparative Analysis Across Development Thresholds.”

Honorable Mention

  • Joel Hanel, Ph.D. candidate in political science at the University of Mississippi, Oxford, for “Assessing the Impact of Female Casualties on Support for Military Conflict.”
  • Ashley Tallevi, Ph.D. candidate in political science at the University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, for “Making the Political Personal: Health Insurance, the Submerged State, and Women's Political Engagement.”

2014 Winners

  • Erin C. Cassese, associate professor of political science at West Virginia University, Morgantown, W.Va., and Mirya R. Holman, assistant professor of political science at Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, Fla., for “Not a Team Player? Communal Challenges to Female Candidates.”
  • Tarah Williams, Kylee Britzman and Paul Testa, Ph.D. candidates in political science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Ill., for “The Potential to Persuade: The Gendered Effects of Informal Political Discussions.”
  • Christina Xydias, assistant professor of political science at Clarkson University, Potsdam, N.Y., for “The Conservative Woman: A Comparative Study of Germany and the United States.”

Honorable Mention

  • Nichole M. Bauer, visiting assistant professor of political science at Davidson College, Davidson, N.C., for “Strategic Gender Stereotyping in Congressional Campaigns.”
  • Noaquia Callahan, Ph.D. candidate in history at the University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa, for “Divided Duty: African American Feminist Transnational Activism and the Lure of the Imperial Gaze, 1888-1922.”
  • Ashley Farmer, postdoctoral fellow in history at Duke University, Durham, N.C., for “What You've Got is a Revolution: Black Women's Theorizing of Black Power Politics.”
  • Kendall Funk, Ph.D. candidate in political science at Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, for “Elected on a Ledge: Women Mayors and the Glass Cliff in Brazil.”

2013 Winners

  • Annette Joseph-Gabriel, Ph.D. candidate in the French and Italian department at Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tenn., for “Women Subverting Empire: Gender and Anticolonial Politics in the Francophone World (1940-1975).”
  • Michael Callaghan Pisapia, assistant professor of politics and international affairs at Wake Forest University, Winston-Salem, N.C., for “Governing Education: Gender, Federalism and the Rise of Women's Political Authority.”
  • Beth Reingold, associate professor of political science at Emory University, Atlanta, Ga., and Adrienne Smith, assistant professor of political science at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tenn., for “Legislative Incorporation and Intersections of Gender, Race, and Ethnicity in the American States.”

Honorable Mention

  • Wendy E. Chmielewski, curator at the Swarthmore College Peace Collection, Swarthmore, Pa., for “Her Hat Was in the Ring: U.S. Women Who Ran for Political Office Before 1920.”
  • Melanie Hughes, associate professor of sociology at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pa., for “Indigenous Women in Politics Worldwide.”

2012 Winners

  • Karin Hayes and Amy C. Elliott , New York filmmakers, for "Power Shift."
  • Kimberly Cowell-Meyers, assistant professor of government at American University, Washington, DC, for "Women's Political Parties: Their Emergence, Substance and Impact."
  • Jaclyn Kettler, Ph.D. candidate in the political science department at Rice University, Houston, TX, for "Campaign Networks and the Success of Female State Legislative Candidates."
  • Dawn Teele, Ph.D. candidate in the political science department at Yale University, New Haven, CT, for "Understanding Descriptive Representation Requires Better Data: A Proposal to Collect and Refine Data on Women in Parliament."

Honorable Mention

  • Mona Tajali, Ph.D. candidate in humanities at Concordia University, Montreal, Canada, for "Demanding a Seat at the Table: Women's Organizing for Political Representation in Iran and Turkey."
  • Kerith Woodyard, assistant professor of communication at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb, for "A Bulldog Running along the Feet of Jesus: A Rhetorical Analysis."

2011 Winners

  • Karen Beckwith, professor of political science, Case Western Reserve University, Claire Annesley, senior lecturer of politics, the University of Manchester, Isabelle Engeli, assistant professor of public and international affairs, University of Ottawa, Susan Franceschet, associate professor of political science, University of Calgary, for "Gender and Cabinet Recruitment: Pace and Profile in Gendering Government."
  • Melody Ellis Valdini, assistant professor of political science, Portland State University, for "A Stubborn Assumption of Innocence: The Effect of Corruption on Women’s Representation.”

Honorable Mention

  • Jaimie Bleck, Ford Family assistant professor of political science, University of Notre Dame, and Kristin Michelitch, Ph.D. candidate of political science, New York University, for "Good Morning Timbuktu! The Impact of Radio in Rural Islamic Africa."
  • Anna L. Bostwick Flaming, Ph.D. candidate in History, the University of Iowa, for “The Most Important Person in the World: The Changing Political and Cultural Meanings of American Housewifery in the Second Half of the Twentieth Century."
  • David Broockman, graduate student of political science, University of California,
 Berkeley, for "Can Successful Female Candidates Break Glass Ceilings for Others?"

2010 Winners

  • Sarah A. Fulton, assistant professor of political science, Texas, A&M University, College Station, TX for "What Underlies the Gendered Quality Gap? The Role of Perceptions in Shaping the Supply of Female Candidates."
  • Priscilla Ann Lambert, assistant professor of political science, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, and Druscilla Scribner, assistant professor of political science, University of Wisconsin - Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI, for "Gender and Constitutions: A Politics of Difference vs. Equality."

Honorable Mention

  • Tali Mendelberg, associate professor of politics, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, Christopher F Karpowitz, assistant professor of political science, Brigham Young University, Provo, UT, and Lee Shaker, postdoctoral researcher, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ, for "Gender Equity and Deliberative Justice."
  • Trish Gibson, doctoral student in political science, Indiana University, Bloomington, IN, for "Gender Outreach and Sustainability in Microfinance: Does a Tradeoff Exist?"
  • Brittany L. Stalsburg, doctoral student in political science, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ, for "Voting for Mom or Dad: How Parenthood Affects Political Candidacy."

2009 Winners

  • Amy Beth Aronson, assistant professor of journalism and media studies, Fordham University, New York, NY, for "To Live Greatly - That is the Thing': The Life and times of Crystal Eastman, the Woman Behind the ACLU."
  • Kim Miller, assistant professor of art history and women's studies and coordinator of the Women's Studies Program, Wheaton College, Norton, MA, for "Selective Silencing and the Shaping of Memory in Post-Apartheid South African Visual Culture."
  • Anca Turcu, lecturer in political science, Iowa State University, Ames, IA, for "Winning Seats without Gaining Power: Weak Parliaments, Political Strategies and Women MPs in Emerging Democracies."

Honorable Mention

  • Kelly Dittmar, research associate and program assistant at the Center for American Women and Politics and Ph.D. candidate in political science, Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, New Burnswick, NJ, for "Campaigns as Gendered Institutions: Stereotypes and Strategy in Statewide Races."

2008 Winners

  • Valerie Hennings, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, for "Learning to Lead: State-Based Political Leadership Programs and Women's Political Participation."
  • Jennifer M. Piscopo, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California, San Diego, CA, for "Do Women Represent Women? Gender and Policy in Argentina."

Honorable Mention

  • Melody Rose, chair of the Department of Political Science at Portland State University, Portland, OR, and Regina G. Lawrence, the Kevin P. Reilly Sr. Chair in Political Communication at Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA, for "Playing the Gender Card? Media, Strategy, and Hillary Clinton's Campaign for the White House."
  • Megan Boccardi, Ph.D. candidate in the Department of History at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO, for "Remembering the Civil War: Women's Memorialization in Missouri."
  • Michelle M. Taylor-Robinson, associate professor, and Maria Escobar-Lemmon, associate professor, Department of Political Science at Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, for "Tokens, Representatives or Players?: Female Cabinet Secretaries in Presidential Democracies."

2007 Winners

  • Karen Kedrowski, professor and chair of the Department of Political Science, Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC, for "Gender and the Public Speakership: News Media Coverage of Speaker Nancy Pelosi."
  • Candice Ortbals, assistant professor of political science, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA, and Meg Rincker, visiting assistant professor of political science, Illinois Wesleyan University, Bloomington, IL, for "Decentralization and Women’s Policy Agencies: Relocating Feminist Policy in Spain, Chile, Poland and Pakistan."

Honorable Mention

  • Nicole Eaton, doctoral student in history at Brown University, Providence, RI, for "Women’s History and Women’s Rights: Gender and Collective Memory in American Feminism, 1948-1998."
  • Carly Woods, doctoral teaching fellow in communication and women’s studies at the University of Pittsburgh, PA, for "Women’s Debating Societies as Argumentative Laboratories for Political Activism: The Cases of Lucy Stone and Genevieve Blatt."

2006 Winners

  • Pamela Paxton, associate professor of sociology and political science at The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, for "How Women Attain Political Power: Understanding Women's Representation in Parliaments, 1893-2003."
  • Aili Mari Tripp, associate dean of international students and professor of political science and women's studies at University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI, for "Women and Peacemaking in Africa: When, Why and How Gender Matters."

Honorable Mention

  • Jenny Barker-Devine, Ph.D. candidate in history at Iowa State University, Ames, IA, for "'Our Cherished Ideals': Rural Women, Activism, and Identity in the Midwest, 1950-1990."
  • Petra Hejnova, Ph.D. candidate in political science at Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY, for "Free (Not) to Organize: Uncovering Effects of State Policies on Women's Activism in the Czech Republic and Chile."

2005 Winners

  • Karrin Anderson, assistant professor of speech communication at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, CO, and Kristina Sheeler, assistant professor of communication studies at Indiana University-Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, for "Woman President: Gender, Rhetorical Leadership, and the U.S. Presidency."
  • Miki Kittilson, assistant professor of political science at Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, for "Women, Elected Office, and Policy Choices in Cross-National Perspective, 1960-2005."
  • Lester Olson, professor of communication and women's studies at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for "Audre Lorde's Public Speeches: Poet Orator, Wounded Warrior."
  • Diana Santillán, graduate student in anthropology and human sciences and lecturer in women's studies at George Washington University, Washington, DC, for "Local-Global Negotiations: An Ethnographic Case Study of a Women's Organization in the Peruvian Amazon."

Honorable Mention

  • Phyllis Brashler, Ph.D. student in sociology and anthropology, Northeastern University, Boston, MA, for "Flirting with Feminism: The State and Battered Women's Movement in Massachusetts."

2004 Winners

  • Kathleen Laughlin, professor and chair of the Department of History, Metropolitan State University, Minneapolis-St. Paul, MN, for "Citizen Clubwoman: The Politics and Culture of Women's Clubs in Postwar America."
  • Patricia Melzer, assistant professor and director of women's studies, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA, for "Terroristenmadchen": Women in Radical Left Political Groups in Germany and the U.S. in the 1970s."
  • Catherine Rymph, assistant professor of history, University of Missouri- Columbia, Columbia, MO, for "As Women Go, The Country Goes: American Women, Gender, and Nation Building after WWII."

Honorable Mention

  • Kathleen A. Bratton, assistant professor of political science, Louisiana State University. Baton Rouge, LA, and Michelle Barnello, assistant professor of political science, Christopher Newport University, Newport News, VA, for "Bridging the Gender Gap: The Representation of ‘Women's Interests’ in State Legislatures."

2003 Winners

  • Douglas Schrock, assistant professor of sociology, and Sammy Rastagh, graduate student in sociology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, for "Gender Dynamics in the Global Justice Movement."
  • Aparna Thomas, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, for "Women's Participation in the Panchayati Raj: A Case Study of Maharashtra, India."
  • Gina Serignese Woodall, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, for "Playing Hardball in a Dress?: Gender Differences in the Effectiveness of Negative Campaigns"

Honorable Mention

  • Lee Ann Banaszak, associate professor of political science and women's studies, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pa, for "In and Out of State: Feminists in the Federal Bureaucracy and their Effect on the Women's Movement."
  • Mary Saracino Zboray, independent scholar, and Ronald Zboray, director of graduate studies and associate professor of communication and history, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, for "Voices Without Votes: Women's Political Consciousness and Partisan Engagement in Antebellum New England."

2002 Winners

  • Karen K. Garner, director of the Women's Center and adjunct professor of history, Florida International University, Coral Gables, FL, for "Women and Global Leadership: Theory and Practice in the World YWCA, 1914-2000."
  • Kimberley Manning, Ph.D. student in political science, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, for "Sexual Equality and State-Building Gender Conflict in the Great Leap Forward."
  • Corrine M. McConnaughy, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, for "Activists, Institutions, and Organizations: Retelling the Story of Suffrage Rights Extension in a Federal System."

Honorable Mention

  • Lisa Baldez, assistant professor and Harbison faculty fellow in political science, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, for "Elected Bodies: Gender Quota Laws for Legislative Candidates."
  • Maurice Hamington, philosophy instructor, Lane Community College, Eugene, OR, for "Sympathetic Knowledge: The Ethics and Politics of Jane Addams."

2001 Winners

  • Ada Cheng, assistant professor of sociology, DePaul University, Chicago, IL, for "Serving the Household and the Nation: Filipina Domestics and the Politics of Nationhood in Taiwan."
  • Richard L. Fox, assistant professor of political science, Union College, Schenectady, NY, and Jennifer Lawless, Ph.D. candidate in political science, Stanford University, Stanford, CA, for "Gender, Political Ambition and the Decision to Run for Elective Office."
  • Jerry L. Miller, assistant professor of communications and director of forensics, Ohio University, Athens, OH, and Ann Gordon, assistant professor of political science, Miami University-Ohio, Oxford, OH, for "When Stereotypes Collide: Race, Gender and Congressional Campaigns."

Honorable Mention

  • Leslie Petty, Ph.D. candidate in English, University of Georgia, Athens, GA, for "Romancing the Vote: Feminist Activism in American Fiction, 1870-1920."
  • Katherine Mellen Charron, Ph.D. candidate in history, Yale University, New Haven, CT, for "'What You Have in Your Mind and Heart to Do': Septima Clark, Radical Education, and the African American Freedom Struggle."

2000 Winners

  • Nancy E. Crowe, assistant professor of government, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH, for "The Effects of Race and Sex on Decision Making on the U.S. Court of Appeals."
  • Lynda Lee Kaid, professor of telecommunication, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, and Mary Banwart, Ph.D. candidate in communication, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, for "Webstyle: Comparison of Gender Differences in Candidate Presentation on the Internet."
  • Carol Lomicky, professor of journalism, University of Nebraska-Kearney, Kearney, NE, for "Political Ideology in The Woman's Tribune: The Journalism of Clara Bewick Colby."

Honorable Mention

  • Deana Rohlinger, graduate student in sociology, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA, for "Formal Social Movement Organizations and Media Frames: Examining the Influence of the National Organization for Women and Concerned Women for America on Mass Media in the Abortion Debate."

1999 Winners

  • Kim Fridkin Kahn, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, for "How Men and Women Govern: Gender Differences in the Goals and Effectiveness of U.S. Senators."
  • Christina Wolbrecht, associate professor of political science, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, and J. Kevin Corder, professor and chair of the Department of Political Science, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI, for "Women's Voting Behavior in the 1920s and Early 1930s."
  • Karen Kampwirth, professor of political science, Knox College, Galesburg, IL, for "Feminism and Guerrilla Politics in Latin America."

1998 Winners

  • Holly McCammon, professor of sociology, and Karen Campbell, associate professor of sociology, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN, for "How Women Won the Vote: The Political Successes of State Suffrage Movements, 1866-1920."
  • Margaret Trevor, assistant professor of political science, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, for "Party Identification, Socialization and the Gender Gap."

1997 Winners

  • Kathleen Dolan, assistant professor of political science, University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh, Oshkosh, WI, for "Determinants of Support for Women Candidates for Congress in the 1990s."
  • Linda Brigance, Ph.D. candidate in communication, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, for “Iowa and the Equal Rights Amendment: Seventy-Four Years of Controversy.”

1996 Winners

  • Carole Chaney, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of California-Riverside, Riverside, CA, for “The Impact of Campaigns and Candidate Gender on Vote Choice in Senate Elections 1988-1992.”

Honorable Mention

  • Jenny Barbara White, assistant professor of sociology and anthropology, University of Nebraska-Omaha, Omaha, NE, for “Rethinking Civil Society: Reciprocal Foundations for Women’s Civic Action in Urban Turkey.”

1995 Winners

  • Cheryl Logan Sparks, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, for “How Grandmother Won the War: Strategic and Organization Lessons from the Struggle of Suffrage.”

1994 Winners

  • Leonie Huddy, professor of political science, State University of New York at Stony Brook, NY, for “Feminism and Feminists: A Symbolic Politics Study.”
  • Robin M. LeBlanc, Ph.D. candidate in political science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK, for “Homeless as Citizens: The Political World of the Japanese Housewife.”